lilopelekai

angelclark:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

utism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

daily-owls

becausebirds:

instagram:

Staring Into the Eyes of a Hawk with @floatingfeather

To see more fiercely beautiful raptors, follow @floatingfeather on Instagram.

“You can disappear into the fire and magic of the eyes of a hawk,” says Mike Shaw of HawkWatch International (@floatingfeather). He would know: The non-profit organization leads regular wildlife trips in Nevada, where visitors can come face-to-face with apex predators. Recently, Mike took a high school class to a hawk migration site located on a steep, windswept bridge. “The students got to the top, some close to tears, and immediately wanted to go home—until hawks started zipping past their heads,” he says. “Suddenly, they never wanted to leave.”

HawkWatch’s Instagram features piercing, up-close-and-personal photos of hawks and other birds of prey, with one goal in mind: inspiration. “It would be great if a picture prompts someone to turn their eyes to the sky for a couple of minutes a day, to put up a nest box, to volunteer somewhere,” he says. “Or to just realize how fiercely beautiful raptors are.”

Would love to do this in Nevada!